Fisheries and Fisheries Management

Spatial reference points for groundfish

Reuchlin-Hugenholtz E, Shackell NL, Hutchings JA. Spatial reference points for groundfish. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2016 ;73(10):2468 - 2478. Available from: http://icesjms.oxfordjournals.org/content/73/10/2468.abstract?etoc
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

According to density-dependent habitat selection theory, areas of high density can be indicative of high population productivity and have positive individual fitness consequences. Here, we explore six groundfish populations on the Scotian Shelf, Canada, where a decline in areas of high density beyond a certain threshold is associated with disproportionately large declines in Spawning Stock Biomass (SSB). This is evidenced by empirical, concave, positive relationships between high-density areas (HDAs) and SSB. We introduce a methodology to estimate the threshold below which SSB declines increasingly faster per unit of HDA decline. The spatial threshold among these six stocks was remarkably consistent; when stocks lose 70–80% of HDAs, disproportionately large SSB declines are likely to occur. We propose that spatial thresholds could serve as spatial reference points to complement existing SSB limit reference points (LRPs). For some stocks we identify spatial thresholds which correspond to SSB levels that exceed those associated with the designated SSB LRP, suggesting that a review of these SSB LRPs warrants merit. For other stocks, spatial reference points can be used in concert with SSB reference points, strengthening efforts to incorporate a precautionary approach to fisheries management. Our results warrant further research into the general application of HDA as spatial limit and target reference points for fisheries management in addition to other population status indicators within a broad recovery framework.

Tradeoffs between fisheries harvest and the resilience of coral reefs

Bozec Y-M, O'Farrell S, J. Bruggemann H, Luckhurst BE, Mumby PJ. Tradeoffs between fisheries harvest and the resilience of coral reefs. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [Internet]. 2016 . Available from: http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2016/03/31/1601529113
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Many countries are legally obliged to embrace ecosystem-based approaches to fisheries management. Reductions in bycatch and physical habitat damage are now commonplace, but mitigating more sophisticated impacts associated with the ecological functions of target fisheries species are in their infancy. Here we model the impacts of a parrotfish fishery on the future state and resilience of Caribbean coral reefs, enabling us to view the tradeoff between harvest and ecosystem health. We find that the implementation of a simple and enforceable size restriction of >30 cm provides a win:win outcome in the short term, delivering both ecological and fisheries benefits and leading to increased yield and greater coral recovery rate for a given harvest rate. However, maintaining resilient coral reefs even until 2030 requires the addition of harvest limitations (<10% of virgin fishable biomass) to cope with a changing climate and induced coral disturbances, even in reefs that are relatively healthy today. Managing parrotfish is not a panacea for protecting coral reefs but can play a role in sustaining the health of reefs and high-quality habitat for reef fisheries.

Bioeconomic multistock reference points as a tool for overcoming the drawbacks of the landing obligation

García D, Prellezo R, Sampedro P, Da-Rocha JMaría, Castro J, Cerviño S, García-Cutrín J, Gutiérrez M-J. Bioeconomic multistock reference points as a tool for overcoming the drawbacks of the landing obligation. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2016 :fsw030. Available from: http://icesjms.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2016/03/20/icesjms.fsw030
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The landing obligation policy was one of the major innovations introduced in the last Common Fisheries Policy reform in Europe. It is foreseen that the policy will affect the use of fishing opportunities and hence the economic performance of the fleets. The problem with fishing opportunities could be solved if single-stock total allowable catches (TACs) could be achieved simultaneously for all the stocks. In this study, we evaluate the economic impact of the landing obligation policy on the Spanish demersal fleet operating in the Iberian Sea region. To generate TAC advice, we used two sets of maximum sustainable yield (MSY) reference points, the single-stock MSY reference points defined by ICES and a set of multistock reference points calculated simultaneously using a bioeconomic optimization model. We found that the impact of the landing obligation is time and fleet dependent and highly influenced by assumptions about fleet dynamics. At fishery level, multistock reference points mitigate the decrease in the net present value generated by the implementation of the landing obligation. However at fleet level, the effect depends on the fleet itself and the period. To ensure the optimum use of fishing opportunities, the landing obligation should be accompanied by a management system that guarantees consistency between single-stock TACs. In this regard, multistock reference points represent an improvement over those currently in use. However, further investigation is necessary to enhance performance both at fleet level and in the long term.

Delineating the continuum of marine ecosystem-based management: a US fisheries reference point perspective

Dolan TE, Patrick WS, Link JS. Delineating the continuum of marine ecosystem-based management: a US fisheries reference point perspective. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2015 :fsv242. Available from: http://icesjms.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2015/12/28/icesjms.fsv242.abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Ecosystem management (EM) suffers from linguistic uncertainty surrounding the definition of “EM” and how it can be operationalized. Using fisheries management as an example, we clarify how EM exists in different paradigms along a continuum, starting with a single-species focus and building towards a more systemic and multi-sector perspective. Focusing on the specification of biological and other systemic reference points (SRPs) used in each paradigm and its related regulatory and governance structures, we compare and contrast similarities among these paradigms. We find that although EM is a hierarchical continuum, similar SRPs can be used throughout the continuum, but the scope of these reference points are broader at higher levels of management. This work interprets the current state of the conversation, and may help to clarify the levels of how EM is applied now and how it can be applied in the future, further advancing its implementation.

Managing catch of marine megafauna: Guidelines for setting limit reference points

K. Curtis A, Moore JE, Boyd C, Dillingham PW, Lewison RL, Taylor BL, James KC. Managing catch of marine megafauna: Guidelines for setting limit reference points. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2015 ;61:249 - 263. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X15002031
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Limit reference points (LRPs) for catch, which correspond to thresholds to undesirable population or ecosystem states, offer a consistent, objective approach to management evaluation and prioritization across fisheries, species, and jurisdictions. LRPs have been applied successfully to manage catch of some marine megafauna (elasmobranchs, marine reptiles, seabirds, and marine mammals) in some jurisdictions, such as the use of Potential Biological Removal (PBR) to manage incidental mortality of marine mammals under the U.S. Marine Mammal Protection Act. However, implementation of ecosystem-based management is still in its infancy globally, and LRPs have not yet been widely adopted for marine megafauna, particularly for incidental catch. Here, guidelines are proposed for estimating catch LRPs for marine megafauna, with particular attention to resolving common technical and political challenges, including (1) identifying management units, population thresholds, and risk tolerances that align with common conservation goals and best practices, (2) choosing catch LRP estimators, (3) estimating input parameters such as abundance and productivity, (4) handling uncertainty, and (5) dealing with mismatches between management jurisdictions and population boundaries. The problem of cumulative impacts across sectors is briefly addressed. These guidelines, grounded in marine policy, science, precedent, and lessons learned, should facilitate wider application of catch LRPs in evaluation and management of fisheries impacts on marine megafauna, in support of global commitments to conserve biodiversity and manage fisheries responsibly.

Subscribe to RSS - Fisheries and Fisheries Management